Ambulance director fired one month after alleged ‘rumors’

E-BarnesIt may have been a rumor last month, but as of Monday afternoon it became a reality. Powell County Ambulance Service Director Eddie Barnes was dismissed from his position by Powell County Judge Executive James Anderson. Barnes had served as director since Jan. 26, 2011. He was appointed by then judge executive, the late Jim Potts.
Anderson had advised a crowded courtroom, with television cameras looking on, during last months fiscal court meeting that rumors about personnel changes at the ambulance service were not true. That included questions about Barnes being a target for dismissal.
However, Anderson has now cited reasons as to why he fired Barnes.
“It was one of my main concerns, when I ran for office, that our public safety be efficient and that we use our tax dollars wisely,” Anderson told the Times Tuesday morning. “I have worked feverishly at this and have tried to work with the director. However, either he (Barnes) was unwilling or unable and failed to this task.”
At question for Anderson was Banes handling of time cards for the EMS employees, the scheduling and cost issues, as well as the use of the purchase order system. Anderson said that Barnes had failed to keep correct track of employee’s time and time cards. “I feel as if we have been charged for time that may not have been worked or that some double pay was happening and that is wrong,” Anderson said.
Anderson also said that he had asked Barnes to look at scheduling and try to rein in the money being spent there. “I was told by the director that the schedule that was being used was the best it could possibly get; however, we have shown it can be done more efficiently,” Anderson said. ‘We have cut two-thirds of what we were running over each day and the service has not been affected. In fact we are more efficient. This was an oversight or mismanagement, if you would, by the director.”
Anderson spoke about how there were instances of items being purchased and then the service trying to obtain purchase order numbers to have the county pay for the items. “The P.O. system helps to monitor spending and if one chooses to ignore or not adhere to that policy then we have no legitimate control over the spending,” he added. “I understand there may be times when it is an emergency and has to be done, but we need to control the finances.”
Anderson said that at the rate the financial situation was going if it was not corrected than the layoffs rumored to be coming last month could happen. “We’re trying to make sure that does not happen,” Anderson stated. “This is not an attack on the ambulance service; on the contrary I believe we have great crews and staff. We are just trying to make sure we can provide a better service by controlling our costs. If we don’t then those layoffs could come. We don’t want that.”
Anderson also mentioned that he felt that Barnes was “shirking his duties” when it came to the drug policy. “I want each medic to feel sure that when they climb in the truck their partner is drug free and to insure that the people on the roads know that our staffs are drug-free,” Anderson said.
In recent weeks two ambulance service employees have been brought before the fiscal court after one allegedly failed a drug screening test. That employee is contesting the results. The other employee reportedly refused to be tested. The Times has learned that at least two other employees also failed the drug screening and left their positions.
Barnes was reached by the Times late Monday night and he advised that this did not come as a surprise. “It seems like he (Anderson) has been coming at me,” Barnes said. “Not sure why. But some of the things he has mentioned to me I can refute. I have loved working for the people of Powell County and have tried to do my best.” Barnes indicated that were things he would like to discuss, but has chosen not at this time.
Anderson said he had no doubts in Barnes ability and skill as a medic. He also said had no doubts about the EMS crew’s abilities. “I just felt it was time we make a change and get things under control,” Anderson explained. “I hope people understand that this did not slip up on us overnight. I have tried to work through this and have exhausted all possibilities before making this decision.”
Assistant Director Arlene Rogers will take over the helm until a new director is named. Anderson said that there would be some talks next week as to the process of finding a new director.

Dreams come true for tornado victims thanks to ‘Operation Prom Project’

prom-4At the age of seventeen a lot of things are important but it seems to most teens that age one of the most important things is prom. It is something you look forward to and something you prepare for many months. This weekend the students at PCHS will celebrate theirs.
However, for some students this year prom is not as they may have planned due to the devastation of the recent tornadoes. Local students from Powell County High School have begun Operation Prom Project to help students in the tornado stricken counties of Morgan, Wolfe, and Magoffin.
The students along with some local businesses and others are doing their part to make sure these students still get to have a Prom.
Last weekend Carmen McKinney from Parkway Florist went to Morgan County to assist those in need. McKinney explained that they had set up dresses, shoes, jewelry, and alterations for the girls and let them shop around and pick out their own dress. Accessories were also available. They also set up tuxedo rentals for the boys.
McKinney said, “The girls got to be princesses for the day, it was overwhelming, we were met with such hospitality, graciousness, and gratitude from all of the children.”
Operation Prom Project helped so many and still have many more to help.  McKinney explained, “We are asking for sponsors for the $30 cost.  Once we have the name of the student, we will e-mail or call you with the boys name and contact information.  This is a definite way of knowing exactly how your donation will help.  We went to the first of three schools this past Saturday and measured 64 boys for tuxes and over 100 dresses were given away by an amazing charity called Cinderella’s Closet .We still have two more schools to go and desperately need your help.  You can help by sponsoring a student’s tux cost of $30.”
Several people and business have donated or are helping including Kentucky Floral Association, Miss Teen Kentucky, Kentucky State Police, Powell County High School, Hair Force One, The Clay City Times, Driesbach Wholesale and Genos to name a few.
If you would like to donate, help, or have any questions please contact Carmen McKinney at (606) 663-4291 or by email at parkwaylorist@yahoo.com.

Greatest Show on Earth: The lying games are never in your favor

I'm just saying . . .  James Cook - Times Editor

I'm just saying . . . James Cook - Times Editor

Once again spring is upon us and so are the pesky fly-by-night home repair and landscaping people. I have already been approached twice about sealing my driveway, twice about mowing my yard and making it look like a pro baseball field. I found that one funny because I was on my riding mower when they stopped by. I’ve even been asked about putting on a new roof. That group stopped me while I was in Mt. Sterling.
Of all of those people, when I told them I worked at a newspaper and would like to see a business card, in case I was interested later, only one gave me a card. And he was quite honest, he said he’d only be in town another day or two and he was heading back down south.
It seems like there are people always looking to either take adavantage or try to make a quick buck with every chance they can. Now if it is legit, make that money. But if not, move on out of my way.
It is not just people trying to pick up a quick buck that I keep an eye on. I also keep my eyes on people who make a lot of promises and never seem to come through. Oh, sometimes they come up with a good deal. But as a rule they usually bite off more than they could chew.
It is those people I keep a good eye on.
You see, I like honesty, integrity and hard-work ethics. If its a job worth doing, its worth doing well – the first time. If I can’t trust your word, a handshake or a piece of paper won’t do either.
Trust is earned and rightfully so. If we just believe everything we are told, we become like lemmings and end up falling off cliffs. Never did understand that.
I believe in people until they give me a reason not to. I’m a people watcher and I like seeing how people’s actions and words match up. I don’t believe anyone doubts me when I say what I believe or what I am going to do. I expect the same from others.
What’s that old saying, you’re only as good as your word?
It is nothing for politicians to make promises and then never keep them. The voters have become so used to being lied to they just accept it. Then they forget and keep voting for people who can’t tell you the truth.
Not me.
If you will lie to me once, I figure you will do it again. That really runs all over me.
I understand someone may get busy and meant to follow through, but things happened. I’ve been there. But the effort was put forth, earnestly put forth, and with that I can accept the effort.
But blatant misleading, scratch that, lies, I cannot nor will I accept. If you lie to me then you do not respect me in any manner. It insults me and my intelligence (not that I have a lot of that).
In this job I have to talk with and interview people daily. I have to look at records, do a little investigating and even try to make sense out of documents and budgets that I know are made to be so confusing so the working man/woman cannot understand where the money goes.
That is all fine and dandy. But I wish more people, especially those in leadership roles, would just tell it like it is and quit trying to sugar-coat everything. Better yet, tell the flat out truth and let the chips fall where they may. It sounds a lot better than the ramblings or attempt to sound like an Ivy League grad when the closest ivy you’ve been to was the poison kind in the woods.
This county, this state and this country is facing a lot of uphill battles. The economy is slow, gas prices are high, insurance is rising (if you’re fortunate to have it) and jobs are falling.
Maybe politicians at all levels feel like they have to give us hope, even false hope, to make us happy.
Maybe they have their own agenda to take care or they just want to make it to the next election and live off the working people. I don’t know.
Maybe some are working hard, but the odds are stacked against them. I could possibly believe that. But regardless, I expect those in charge to be no different than I. Speak the truth, even if it hurts. Don’t be malicious, but don’t be deceitful either.
Many people will read this and say, “He’s on another rant.” Maybe so, but all I’m asking for are leaders who will quit trying to rationalize their moves to stay in power or attempts to keep the good-old boy system in place and do what is right because it is right. No more stories, no more attempts to get something for nothing and no more you watch my back I’ll watch yours.
That includes leaders, supervisors, bosses, coaches, administrators and yes, politicians. No more shell games, no more what’s behind door number three and no more “what they don’t know won’t hurt them” philosophy.
Honesty is truly the best policy and transparancy is more than just a catch phrase. P.T Barnum, the man who helped create the world of making a buck at any cost through entertainment, once said, “There’s a sucker born every minute and two to take him.” I guess that is so, but only if we choose to be the sucker.
I’m just saying . . .

4-12 Obituaries

Herbert R. Cook, 68
Herbert Richard “Dick” Cook, 68, husband of Shirley Cox Cook of Greenway Road, Stanton, passed away on Thursday, April 5, 2012 at Stanton Nursing Center.  Born in Dayton, OH he was a son of the late Herbert Lee and Josephine Kennedy Cook and he was a former printer with Meade Paper Company.  Dick had been involved in the Special Olympics and he had been a Powell County Little League Baseball coach.
In addition to his wife, Shirley, he is also survived by his son, Brian (Sommer) Cook of Richmond; two stepsons: Mike Cox of Stanton and Danny (Cheryl) Cox of Beattyville; one brother, Jessie Lee Cook of Atlanta, GA and by six grandchildren:  Jordan and Noah Cook, Matt, Jeanna, Clint and Jon Cox.  Visitation after 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 12 and funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, April 13 at Hearne Funeral Home Chapel, 125 West College Avenue, Stanton.  Interment will be in Stonegate Cemetery, Stanton with Jeremy Farmer, Shane Southwood, Danny Cox, Joe Stevenson, Mike Cox, Scott Morris and John Crowe serving as pallbearers.  Memorial contributions can be made to Powell County Little League Baseball.  Arrangements by Hearne Funeral Home, Inc.  www.hearnefuneralhome.com

Chrystal Knox, 81
Chrystal Knox, 81, of Childers Road, Clay City, passed away on Saturday, April 7, 2012 at the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, Lexington.  Born in Knowlton, she was the daughter of the late Lawrence and Annie Brandenburg Martin.  Chrystal was employed in family service with Kentucky River Foothills Headstart in Powell County for the last 42 years.  She was a former member of the Eastern Star and she had attended the Cat Creek Church of Christ.  In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by her husband, Elroy Knox; one brother, Weeden Martin and by one sister, Dorothy Foley.
Surviving relatives include three sons:  Larry (Wanda) Lacy and Linvelle (Carol) Knox of Stanton and Jeffrey Knox of Clay City; two daughters:  Norma Powell of Clay City and Karen (Jimmy) Morton of Stanton; one brother, Forest Martin of Stanton; two sisters:  Brenda Hood of Clay City and Eloise (Sherman) Ison of Stanton; 11 grandchildren:  Eddie Lacy, Christy Cox, Eric Knox, Joshua Knox, Tazia Knox, Jonathon Knox, Greg Kiser, Brandy Shanks, Amanda Wright, Cassie Allen and Crissy Barnes along with 10 great grandchildren.
Funeral services officiated by Bro. Warren Rogers were held on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 at Hearne Funeral Home Chapel, 125 West College Avenue, Stanton.  Interment followed in the Knox Lacy Cemetery with Eric Knox, Josh Knox, Eddie Lacy, Mike Barnes, James Wade Allen, Chris Stone and Charlie Walters serving as active pallbearers.
Honorary pallbearers were Betty Wickline, Linda Ratliff, Cathy Abney, Phyllis Adams, Betty Cornett, Joanna Lacy, Chester Crabtree, Leon Banks, Bobby Patrick, Jack Cheek and Leslie Klenke.  Arrangements by Hearne Funeral Home, Inc.  www.hearnefuneralhome.com

Dorothy Sparks, 83
Dorothy Sparks, 83, of 168 West College Avenue in Stanton, passed away Sunday April 8, 2012 at her residence.  She is survived by six sons Don Sparks of Stanton, Benny Sparks (Betty) of Camargo, Bobby Sparks (Debbie) of Stanton, Wayne Sparks of Stanton, Glen A. Sparks of Stanton and Orlan Sparks of Stanton;  as well as two daughters Treva Hollon of West Bend and Bonnie Rawlinson of Madison Alabama. In addition, she is survived by one brother Kenny Bailey of Frankford, as well as several grandchildren and great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held on Wednesday, April 11, with Pastor Raymond Tipton officiating. Burial followed in the Hobbs Cemetery in Wolfe County. Arrangements by Grayson Funeral Home Inc of Clay City.  http://www.graysonfuneralhome.net/

Maurice D. Sipple, 89
Maurice Dekalb Sipple, 89, of Winchester, husband of Janice Kay Osborne Sipple for 35 years, passed away Sunday morning, April 8, 2012, at the Thomson Hood Veterans Center in Wilmore.
A   native of Magoffin County, he was born November 14, 1922 to the late Harry B. and Clara Creech Sipple.  He is a United States Navy Veteran and served as a Seabee during World War II.  He was a partner in the Sipple Brick Company, an accomplished furniture maker and owner of the Early Cabinet Shop and the Hideaway Antique Shop, all in Stanton.  He was a member of the Stanton Baptist Church.
In addition to his wife, he is survived by his children, John Barry Sipple, Maurice David Sipple, Martha Clare Sipple (Harry Enoch), Holly Lianne Gibson, Lisa Lynn Lambert, Veronica (Nick) Erwin, Janna (Kevin) Hedges, Dwight (Teri) Craft, Dwayne (Christina) Craft, 14 grandchildren, one great-grandson, nephews, Harry B. Sipple III, and Bill Bradford, and sister-in-law, Mrs. Harry B. Sipple, Jr.
He was preceded in death by his sister, Eileen Bradford and brother, Harry B. Sipple Jr.
Funeral services will be Friday, April 13 at 1 p.m. at the Rolan G. Taylor Funeral Home, 289 S. Main Sreet, with Rev Jerry Johns officiating.  Visitation will be Friday from 11 a.m. until the hour of services at the funeral home.
Pallbearers will be Harry Sipple III, Bill Bradford, David H. Rogers, Jr., Barry Sipple, Dekota Hedges, and David Sipple.
Honorary pallbearers will be John Venable, John B. Sipple, Jr., Mathew Erwin, and Steve Eubank.  Burial will be in the Winchester Cemetery.  Contributions may be made to Hospice of the Bluegrass, 2312 Alexandria Drive, Lexington, KY 40504, or to Thomson Hood Veterans Center, 100 Veterans Dr., Wilmore, KY 40390.

4-12 Community Calendar

SBDM Parent Election
Nominations for parent representatives on the PCHS School-Based Decision Making Committee will be accepted until April 19.  The election will take place on Thursday, April 26 from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. in the PCHS library.  Absentee ballots will be available April 20 until April 25.  Absentee ballots shall be returned by April 26 at 3:30 p.m. to the front office at PCHS.  All votes will be counted at 7 p.m. on April 26.

Adult Softball League
Boone’s Creek Baptist Camp is now taking signups for their Men and Women’s Summer Softball League. Signups will be taken until April 15. Individuals or Teams wanting to play, please contact, Gale Holbrook, Camp Manager at 859-744-0037 or 859-771-2136.

AmVets Meeting
AmVets Post 67, Clay City, monthly meeting, the first Sunday every month at 2 p.m., Pick ‘n Grin, Bluegrass music free every Friday night!  Bingo every Monday at 6:30 p.m.

Yoga for Beginners
Free beginner yoga classes will be held on Mondays- April 16, 23 and 30 at 4:30 p.m. at the Powell County Extension Office. Poses will be taught in a very basic format and all ages are invited to attend.  For more information, please call Stacy Crase at Foothills Health and Wellness Center at 663-9011.

The Powell County Library
Story Time at the Powell County Public Library is every Thursday from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. for ages 3 to 5 years. We will read stories, do crafts and sometimes a movie. Powell County Public Library Board Meeting will be held on the third Monday of the month at 4 p.m. in the library.

Disabled American Veteran Meeting
The Monthly Meeting of the Powell County Disabled American Veterans Powell County Chapter # 103 is held on the second Thursday each month at 30 Bright Street Stanton at 6 p.m. For information call Joe Neal 663-5895.

Disabled American Veteran Service Officer
The next Disabled American Veteran Service Officer will be available on Friday, April 20 from 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at the DAV meeting Hall 30 Bright Street Stanton. For information call Joe Neal 663-5895.

Free GED
GED exam cost is now FREE!
Visit MSU-Powell County Adult Education to prepare for your GED exam. Call 606-663-1948

Genealogy Help Desk
The Red River Historical Society and Museum located at 4541 Main Street in Clay City has opened a Genealogy Help Desk. It will be staffed by members of the historical society and members of the Red River Valley Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). If you are researching your Eastern Kentucky roots we hope we can be of some help to you. The hours are 2 to 5 p.m. each Sunday at the museum.

Powell County Tourism Commission
The regular board meetings are held every fourth Wednesday at 1 pm. The meetings are held at the office in Slade (behind the red caboose). For more information call 606-663-1161.

Vets Benefits
A Veteran’s Benefits Field Representative will be at the Powell County Courthouse in Stanton, Kentucky on the first Thursday of each month.  The hours are from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.  For further information call toll free 1-866-376-0308.

Clay City Site Base

The Clay City Elementary SBDM will meet the second Thursday of every month at 5:15 p.m.

PCMS Site Base
The Powell County Middle School Site Base Council will have regular meetings on the second Tuesday of every month at 4:30 p.m.

Friends of PC Pets Meetings
Friends of Powell County’s Pets hold their monthly meetings at 6:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of every month at the Powell County Public Library.  If you have any questions or you would like to volunteer or foster, please stop by.

Powell County Diabetes Support Group
Kentucky River Foothills Rural Health Network is sponsoring a Diabetes Support Class.  Classes will meet every second Thursday of the month.  Classes meet at the Powell Adult Day Care (behind Foothills Mobile Clinic) in Clay City from 4-5 p.m.  For more info, please call Tena at 663-9011

Brianna’s Sanctuary Meetings
Brianna’s Sanctuary & Rescue monthly meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on the second Friday of each month, at the Powell County Public Library. If you would like to volunteer or find out the requirements for fostering, come by and join us. For questions call (606) 663-2353 or (859) 576-4846.

Higher Education Meeting
The Powell County Higher Education Development Board will meet on the third Thursday of each month at the Powell County High School Library at 7 p.m.

Berea Clinic
Berea Health Ministry has new hours:  Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 9a.m. to 9 p.m.; Wednesday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 1p.m. to 9 p.m. Berea Health Ministry Clinic in Berea provides medical care for you.  If you have no health insurance or have lost your job, call the clinic (859) 986-1274) for an appointment.  We are here to serve you.

Rabies Clinic
There wil be a rabies clinic on Saturday, May 5. The times and locations are as follows:
1:00 – 1:30 West Bend – West Bend First Church of God, 8891 Winchester Road
1:45 – 2:15 Clay City – AMVETS Building
2:30 – 3:00 Stanton – Powell County High School Bus Garage
3:15 – 3:45 Bowen – Bowen First Church of God
Rabies Shot $5. Other vaccines available. Times may vary depending on participation. Sponsored by:  Stanton Veterinary Clinic and Powell County Health Department

4-12 Court News

Property Transfers
•Powell County Industrial Development Authority Inc. to Powell County Fiscal Court, 2.69 acres-Reed Industrial Park.
•Robert Stamper and Yvonne Stamper to Vanessa Durbin, 0.58 acres-Skinner Branch Road.
•George V. Sparks and Naomi Faye Sparks to Jerry C. and Charlene Weaver, tract 2-Minor subdivision, $32,000.
•Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to James Meade Jr., 1615 L. Hardwick’s Creek Road, $25,900.
•Corbett Tolson, Mary Tolson, and Mary O’Hair to Corbett Tolson and Mary Tolson, 2 tracts.
•Darlene Sparks to James Garner Mullins, 2 tracts-Airport Road, $15,000.
•Robert Joseph Harrison, Reda A. Harrison, Glenda S. McQuerry, and Herlin McQuerry to Blevins Law Office PLLC Trustee, Glenda S. McQuerry, and Herlin McQuerry, 5 tracts-Slade.
•U/T/A Lula Begley Trust and Lula Begley, Trustee to Glenda S. ahd Herlin McQuerry, 5 tracts, $6,100.
•Keith and Wilma Jones to Peggy Hall Putman, 778 Furnace Road.
•Edward Nelson Living Trust and Mary Ann Nelson, Trustee to Ronnie Everman, 4.62 acres-HWY 82, $25,000.
•Kelly Neal and Crystal Neal to Pamela J. Sons, 3188 Paint Creek Road, $30,000.
•Carolyn and Russell Ballard to George Sutton, 1511 and 1525 Nada Tunnel Road.
•Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and Federal Housing Commissioner to Deborah Blankenship, 59 Wells Street, $40,000.
•Alex Bolduc and Rebecca Barnett to Arnold and Amy Anderson, intersection of Spout Springs Road and Strange Hollow Road, $29,000.
•Edith Mink to Karen McIntosh, 0.07 acres-Tug Branch Road, $2,000.
•Victor Lee and Sarah Jane Billings Lee, to Brian Russell Billings, 3 acres-HWY 213.
•Charles and Ruth Stamper to Chan S. and Lisa Coffey, 3.58 acres-Lake Neomia Road, $165,000.
•Elizabeth Maloney to bobbie Maloney, Mary Ann Poore and Betty Atkinson, 0.52 acres-Paint Creek Road.
•Thomas and Laurie Defilippo to Billy and Belinda Collins, 0.09 acres-Meadow Drive.
•Whitaker Bank Inc., to Cassandra and Dallas Conn, lots 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18-Echo Valley Subdivision, $41,250.

Circuit Court
•Jonathan Adams, two counts of theft by unlawful taking/disp-all others, 10 counts of forgery, second degree, continued until April 18.
•Morgan Atkinson, theft by unlawful taking/disp-all others, pretrial conference April 18.
•Bruce Bevins, receiving stolen property under $10,000, continued until May 9.
•Anna Bishop, trafficking in a controlled substance, second degree, first offense, drug unspecified schedule 3, trafficking in a controlled substance, third degree, first offense, drug unspecified, continued until April 18.
•Josh Booth, four counts of rape, third degree, suppression hearing April 17, pretrial conference May 9.
•Jane Crowe Brantley, trafficking in a controlled substance, first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, continued until April 18.
•Barney Brewer, manufacturing methamphetamine, first offense, continued until May 9.
•Mona Bundy, trafficking in a controlled substance, first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, schedule 1 and 2, pretrial conference April 18.
•Christopher D. Caudill, fleeing or evading police, first degree, assault-third degree-police/probation officer-identi, resisting arrest, criminal mischief, first degree, criminal mischief-third degree, continued until May 9.
•Kristin Mays Cope, unlawful transaction with a minor, first degree illegal sex act, under 16 years of age, failure to report child dependency, neglect or abuse, first offense, suppression hearing April 17, pretrial conference May 9.
•Darby Crabtree, shock probation in felony convictions, denied.
•Missy Dawn Crabtree, receiving stolen property (firearm), persistent felony offender – second degree, pretrial conference April 18, trial date April 26.
•Morgan Gary Craig, sexual abuse, first degree, attempted sodomy, third degree, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 18.
•Damon Huston Crawford, receiving stolen property under $10,000, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 18.
•Arthur Davidson, burglary, second degree, criminal mischief, first degree, guilty plea, received 12 months with credit for time served of 36 days.
•Lanny Griffith Jr., two counts of trafficking in a controlled substance, first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 9.
•Johnny Haddix, burglary, second degree, theft by unlawful taking/disp-firearm, theft of controlled substance, first offense and less than $300, persistent felony offender – second degree, continued until April 18.
•Cody Hall, burglary, second degree, theft by unlawful taking/disp-all others, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 9.
•Wendell Hurt, flagrant non support, guilty plea, received two years – diverted for five years.
•Jessica Ingram, trafficking in a controlled substance, first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, schedule 1 and 2, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 18.
•Shawna Johnson, trafficking in a controlled substance first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, guilty plea, received five years, sentencing April 18.
•Shawna Johnson, trafficking in a controlled substance first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, trafficking in a controlled substance, second degree, first offense, drug unspecified, guilty plea, received five years, sentencing April 18.
•Eric Jones, receiving stolen property under $10,000, criminal trespassing-third degree, continued until May 9 to enter plea.
•Sarah Jo Manning, manufacturing methamphetamine, first offense, continued until April 18.
•Mark Mercer, trafficking in a controlled substance, second degree, first offense, drug unspecified, schedule 3, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 18.
•Cassandra K. Miller, false statement/misrepresentation to receive benefits over $100, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 9.
•Devin Miller, trafficking in a controlled substance, first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, schedule 1 and 2, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 18.
•Clinton Muncie, trafficking in a controlled substance first degree, first offense – drug unspecified, controlled substance prescription not in original container first, possession and/or use of radio that sends/receives police messages, buying and/or possession of drug paraphernalia, guilty plea, received seven years, sentencing April 18.
•Horace J. Napier, escape-second degree identify facility, persistent felony offender – first degree, continued until April 18.
•Emily Marlene Parks, false statement/misrepresentation to receive benefits over $100, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 9.
•Marlena Phillips, manufacturing methamphetamine, first offense, continued until May 9 to enter plea or set for trial.
•Robert Thomas Pittman, trafficking in a controlled substance, first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, trafficking in a controlled substance, third degree, first offense, drug unspecified, guilty plea, received five years – diverted for five years.
•Nicole Polley, criminal abuse first degree-child 12 or under, criminal abuse-first degree-child 12 or under, continued until April 18.
•David Lee Ratliff, trafficking in a controlled substance, first degree, first offense, drug unspecified, schedule 1 and 2, trafficking in a controlled substance, second degree, first offense, drug unspecified, schedule 3, continued until April 18.
•Randy Ray Ritchie, theft by unlawful taking/disp-auto, persistent felony offender – second degree, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 18.
•Angela Hope Robbins, promoting contraband – first degree, possession of a controlled substance first offense, second degree, buying and/or possession of drug paraphernalia, public intoxication controlled substance excluding alcohol, not guilty plea, continued until May 9.
•Zachary Smyth, fraudulent use of credit card under $10,000, continued until May 9.
•Brian Swango, wanton endangerment – first degree, promoting contraband – first degree, resisting arrest, continued until May 9.
•April D. Swartz, operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs with .08, aggravator, first offense, first degree possession of a controlled substance, drug unspecified, first offense, possession of a controlled substance first offense, second degree, possession of a controlled substance, third degree – drug unspecified, wanton endangerment – first degree, sentenced to two years – serve six months – balance probated for three years.
•Jason Raymond Taulbee, kidnapping-adult, assault fourth degree no visible injury, persistent felony offender – first degree, pretrial conference May 9, trial date May 16.
•Jason Raymond Taulbee, escape-second degree identify facility, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 9.
•Kathy Thacker, two counts of receiving stolen property under $10,000, pretrial conference April 18, trial date May 8.
•Warren Dean Townsend, assault-third degree-police/probation officer-id’d, resisting arrest, receiving stolen property under $10,000, continued until April 18.
•Shawn Trent, flagrant non support, not guilty plea, continued until May 9.
•David Watkins, sexual abuse, first degree, victim under 12 years of age, continued until April 18.
•Tammy E. Wilson, burglary, third degree, theft by unlawful taking/disp-all others, continued until April 18 to enter plea or cutoff.
•Charles Wyatt, criminal possession of a forged instrument-first degree-I, possession of marijuana, possession of a controlled substance, first degree, first offense (methamphetamine), continued until May 9.
•Priscilla Yeary, two counts of trafficking in a controlled substance, second degree, first offense, drug unspecified, schedule 3, continued until April 18.
•Jennifer Marie Campbell, first degree possession of a controlled substance, drug unspecified, first offense, buying and/or possession of drug paraphernalia, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 18.

District Court
•James Ammons I, person 18-20 possession and/or purchase, attended purchase or to have another purchase alcohol, possession of marijuana, buying and/or possession of drug paraphernalia, pretrial diversion order, pay by May 8.
•Shelby Banks, criminal trespassing-third degree, defendant did not appear, bench warrant with a $250 cash bond.
•Raymond L. Caskey, public intoxication from a controlled substance excluding alcohol, not guilty plea, defendant declined attorney, pretrial conference May 8.
•Robert G. Ferguson III, buying and/or possession of drug paraphernalia, guilty plea, $100 fine plus costs.
•Paul James Johnson, person 18-20 possession and/or purchase/ attended purchase or have another purchase alcohol, possession of marijuana, buying and/or possession of drug paraphernalia, pretrial diversion ordered, pay by May 8.
•Robert L. McIntosh, disorderly conduct, second degree, not guilty plea, defendant declined attorney, pretrial conference May 15.
•Jessica F. Muncie, endangering the welfare of a minor, defendant reportedly in hospital, show cause April 17.
•Michael R. Osborne, possession of marijuana, pass to April 17.
•Bobbie Strange, falsely reporting an incident, defendant did not appear, bench warrant with $2,500 cash bond.
•Ruby Tharpe, failure to report child dependancy neglect or abuse first offense, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 15.
•Randy G. Watson, theft by deception-including cold checks under $500, pass to April 24.
•Carl W. Bowling, failure to wear seat belts, failure to appear.
•Barry Joe Chaney, operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, .08 second offense, disregarding traffic control device, traffic light, not guilty plea, pretrial conference April 17.
•Nicholas A. Conner, failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security first, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 22.
•Khristina Everman, speeding 17 mph over (limited access), failure to appear.
•Amanda Madden, failure to wear seat belts, failure of non-owner operator to maintain required insurance, first, dismissed without prejudice, operating on a suspended and/or revoked operators license, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 22.
•Daniel W. Mason, failure to notify address change to the department of transportation, dismissed.
•Calvin McDaniel, license to be in possession, dismissed.
•Jacob A. Parker, license to be in possession, failure to notify address change to the department of transportation, failure to appear.
•Adrian C. Spencer, no/expired registration plates, dismissed, no/expired Kentucky registration receipt,, dismissed, failure of non-owner operator to maintain required insurance, first, failure to produce insurance card, counts three and four continue until April 17, failure to register transfer of motor vehicle, dismissed, operating a vehicle with expired operators license, dismissed.
•Danny Strange, failure to wear seat belts, operating on a suspended and/or revoked operators license, not guilty plea, pretrial conference June 14.
•Donnie W. Venters, no/expired registration plates, no/expired Kentucky registration receipt, failure of owner to maintain required insurance/security first, guilty plea, $500 fine plus costs, failure to produce insurance card, merge with count three, failure to register transfer of motor vehicle, counts one, two and five, dismissed.
•Arthur T. Watkins, no/expired Kentucky registration receipt, no/expired registration plates, failure to register transfer of motor vehicle, failure to wear seat belts, not guilty plea, pretrial conference May 22.
•Leonard S. Webster, failure to notify address change to the department of transportation, dismissed.
•Brian K. Winkle, failure to add taxable unit to taxable inventory, defendant did not appear, bench warrant with $250 dollar cash bond.

The brownie burglar

Sarah Bloom, Times Lifestyles Columnist

Sarah Bloom, Times Lifestyles Columnist

Something woke me.  A crash?  Breaking glass?  My sleepy mind struggled to make sense of the sudden tingling that was running over me…fear.  Maybe I had dreamt it.  Rolling over, I checked the time on my alarm clock…12:30 a.m.
Suddenly the unmistakable sound of shuffling could be clearly heard coming from the other end of my home.  This was definitely no dream.
Quickly I began to shake my sleeping husband.  “I heard a crash in the kitchen,” I hastily whispered.  My four year old son slept peacefully between us and I did not want to wake him.
Jumping up, my husband grabbed his gun and quietly made his way to the bedroom door.  His next words caused my heart to stop, “Sarah, the front door is standing open.”
Immediately my heart jumped to my throat.  I knew that my husband and I both had checked all of the doors in our home before going to bed.  My three older boys were in that end of the house. I automatically assumed someone had thrown something through the front door glass.
Throwing a blanket over my youngest son in an effort to conceal him, I ran to where my other children were.  As I scanned their room I let out a sigh of relief as my gaze fell over each sleeping face…one, two, three.  They were all there and safe, totally oblivious to the terror their father and I were feeling.
As I turned to walk out of their bedroom movement to my right caught my eye.  As my heart dropped to my feet I whirled in that direction.  In the darkness I could barely make out the shape and sound of something coming toward me.  Before I could react, a wet nose nudged my hand.
“Max!” I screamed.  A combination of adrenaline and fear caused my cry to sound more like a high pitched squeak.  “How did he get in here?” my husband quickly asked.
We both knew opening that front door was no small task.  That door had been messed up for quite some time and it literally took a great deal of force to open it.
With this knowledge we both assumed someone had opened the door and the dog had merely followed suite.  But the glass in the door was not broken and I knew that I had definitely heard breaking glass…thick glass.
As I hid behind my husband we carefully made our way toward the kitchen.  Flipping on the lights we discovered the source of the crashing noise.
The night before I had made brownies for dessert in a 13×9 glass Pyrex dish.  After supper I had left that dish on top of my range top as I usually do.
Now all over my kitchen floor was the shattered remnants.  It seemed it had busted into a million tiny pieces mixed with whatever was left of the brownies.
Apparently upon gaining entry to the house Max had decided to help himself to a midnight snack.  His huge paw prints were clearly evident on both sides of my stove where I had left the brownie dish before going to bed.
I am not sure how many of those chocolate treats he succeeded in eating before pulling the entire glass dish down on top of him.
Still spooked my husband went over every inch of our home, checking closets and any dark space.  It took me about thirty minutes of running the sweeper before I was satisfied I had gotten every sliver.
The entire time my stomach was sick from the rush of fear then sudden relief.  I must admit I did not sleep much the rest of that night as nightmare scenarios ran through my head each quickly followed by many prayers thanking the good Lord for watching over our family.
We still do not know how that door got open and to be quite honest we try not to dwell on it too much because it gives us the willies, but at least in hindsight we can now laugh about our midnight brownie burglar.

“But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night…” 2 Peter 3:10

Pirates sailing along, prepare for district foes

LexieThe Powell County Pirates entered the week refreshed after their spring break trip to Myrtle Beach. The Pirates began the week, this past Tuesday, with their first 56th District game of the year against the Lee County Bobcats. Lee County has been a strong opponent for Powell especially in the last few seasons.
Joey Johnson sat down the Bobcats in order in the first inning. The Pirates leadoff hitter, Matt Pelfrey walked and stole second. David Hayes singled to score the first run of the game. Elliot Hale reached base on an error, Billy Hatmaker singled scoring a run, and then Frank Spencer singled driving in a run as well. Johnson grounded to third to score the Pirates fourth run of the inning. Powell lead 4-0 after the first inning.
Preston Booth led off the top of the second with Lee County’s only hit of the game, a single to right field. Booth later scored making the score 4-1. The Pirates added a run in the third inning on singles by Ryan Centers and Hale. Powell put three runs on the board in the fifth inning. Trey Marcum singled and was sacrificed to second by Pelfrey. Cody Morton singled to plate Marcum. Morton stole second and scored on a hit by Hayes. Running for Hayes, Caleb McCoy stole second. McCoy advanced to third and scored on wild pitches. After five innings the Pirates lead was 8-1.
Powell added a lone run in the sixth, Spencer walked to start the inning, Brett Goodwin pinch ran for Spencer and later scored on a double by Shawne Woosley. Johnson was terrific from the mound for the Pirates allowing one run and one hit over six innings. Hatmaker pitched a perfect seventh inning to nail down the victory for the Pirates, 9-1 over Lee County.
Rain cancelled the Wednesday game at Menifee County for the Pirates. This past Friday, the Pirates traveled to Winchester to face the Clark County Cardinals. Powell wasted no time getting on the scoreboard.
Pelfrey led off the game with a single. Morton bunted and reached base on a throwing error by Clark that allowed Pelfrey to score. Hayes reached on an error that scored Morton. Hale singled to score a run. Hatmaker reached on another error and Hale scored. Johnson singled to score another Pirate run. Centers drove in Johnson with a single to right field. Powell led 6-0 before Clark could come to the plate. Hatmaker took the mound for the Pirates and Clark failed to score in the first inning.
The Pirates did not score in the second inning. Clark got on the board in the bottom of the inning with two solo homeruns and a double to make the score 6-3 after two innings. The Pirates, Frank Spencer hit his first homerun of his career to lead off the third inning. Marcum singled and went to second as the ball got past the leftfielder. Pelfrey singled to score the run. Powell led 8-3 heading to the bottom of the third inning.
Clark got two singles to start the third inning and a big two out single to score two runs. After three innings, Powell had an 8-5 lead.
Powell would be held scoreless in the fourth and fifth innings. Clark added a run in the fifth inning as Hatmaker was replaced on the mound by Johnson. Powell held on to win 8 -6 over Clark County.
This past Saturday, the Pirates traveled to Shelby County for a double header. Powell faced Shelby County in the first game and the Pirates cruised to victory 7-1. Conner was the opponent in the second game and the Pirates once again posted a victory winning by a score of 8-1.
Powell’s games from Myrtle Beach were made official last week as the Pirates went 2-3 for the week at the Cal Ripken Experience. The Pirates record now stands at 10-3 for the season.
Powell was scheduled to take on Estill County on Tuesday. The Pirates face Clark County at home on Thursday. The Pirates then travel to Perry Central on Friday and is at home on Saturday against Lawrence County.